LEARN THE SIGNS! SPEAK UP!  
AND REPORT ABUSE!

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This is a list of web sites that offer various content on reporting laws, child abuse, mandatory reporting and other topics which you may find useful. These web sites are not controlled or sponsored by Reporting Laws. There are links to other useful websites throughout the Reporting Laws web site. Look for the logo for links to websites that can provide you more information on a topic that you are viewing.

CHILD ABUSE LAWS

All reports of abuse must be made to the local departments of social services and the appropriate law enforcement agency. To initiate prompt handling of the report of suspected child abuse or neglect, employees of a local department of social services must make a report to the protective services unit.

A report must include:


The name and home address of the child and the parent or other individual responsible for the care of the child.

The present location of the child.

The age of the child.

Names and ages of other children in the home. .

The nature and extent of injuries or sexual abuse or neglect of the child.

Any information relayed by the individual making the report of previous possible physical or sexual abuse or neglect.

Information available to the individual reporting that might aid in establishing the cause of the injury or neglect.

The identity of the individual or individuals responsible for abuse or neglect.

If reporting abuse or neglect of a child involving mental injury, a description of the substantial impairment of the child’s mental or psychological ability to function that was observed and identified and why it is believed to be attributable to an act of maltreatment or omission of proper care and attention.

Reporting Suspected Child Abuse or Neglect Report suspected abuse or neglect to the local department of social services or to a local law enforcement agency.


If you are a health practitioner, educator, human service worker or a police officer, you are required to report both orally and in writing any suspected child abuse or neglect. Oral reports should be made immediately and written reports must be made within 48 hours of contact which disclose the suspected abuse or neglect.

NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE


State Statutes (includes Statutes of Limitations for Prosecution of Child Abuse and Statutes of Limitations for Civil Action for Offenses Against Children): http://www.ndaa.org/ncpca_state_statutes.html

PENALTIES FOR FAILURE TO REPORT AND FALSE REPORTING OF CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT


Series Title: State Statutes

Author(s): Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability: View Download (PDF - 296KB)

Year Published: 2012 - 22 pages


Discusses laws that impose penalties, in the form of either fines of jail time or both, on mandatory reporters who fail to report cases of suspected child abuse and neglect as required by the reporting laws. State laws also may impose penalties on any person who knowingly makes a false report of abuse or neglect. Summaries of laws for all States and U.S. territories are included.

MANDATORY REPORTERS OF CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT


Series Title: State Statutes

Author(s): Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability: View Download (PDF - 493KB)

Year Published: 2012 - 59 pages


Discusses laws that designate the groups of professionals that are required to report cases of suspected child abuse and neglect. Reporting by other persons, the standards for making a report, and confidentiality of reports also are discussed. Summaries of laws for all States and U.S. territories are included.

All States have enacted laws and policies that define State roles and responsibilities in protecting vulnerable children from abuse and neglect. Issues addressed in statute include mandatory reporting, screening reports, proper maintenance and disclosure of records, domestic violence, and other issues.